Arraignments and Bond

Arraignment 1

Lansing Michigan Criminal Defense Attorney

If you are arrested or charged with a crime, the first time you appear in court will be the arraignment. You will appear before a judge or magistrate who will read the charges against you, the maximum penalties, and the rights you have. If charged with a felony you are entitled to be represented by an attorney. If you cannot afford to hire your own lawyer the court will appoint you one at a reduced cost or no cost. If charged with a misdemeanor you are not entitled to a court-appointed attorney unless the charge requires a mandatory jail sentence or the judge thinks it is likely you will be given some jail time if convicted. The court will require you to fill out paperwork listing your income, liabilities, and assets to determine if you meet the eligibility for a court-appointed lawyer. You will also receive notice of your next court dates. The stages and proceedings depend on whether you are charged with a misdemeanor or felony.

Setting Bond

At your arraignment the judge or magistrate will set your bond. The purpose of bond is to ensure that the defendant will show up for future court dates. The court will determine what type of bond you have and the bond amount.

Types of Bond

There are four types of bonds: surety bond, ten percent bond, a full cash bond, and personal recognizance.

  1. Surety Bond—If you cannot afford to post the entire bond amount, a bail bondsmen or bonding company will make a contract with the court guaranteeing the defendant will appear for court dates. The bail bondsmen will require the defendant to post a percentage of the entire bond amount upfront (usually 10% or so).
  2. Ten Percent Bond—There are a couple ways a ten percent bond works. One is when you post 10% of the bond amount to the court or jail. For example, if you bond is $20,000 you would need to post $2,000. The other option is going through a bail bondsmen. You would need to post 25% of that amount with the bondsmen to get released. In other words, you would only have to pay $500 upfront to the bondsmen in the above example. That leaves more money to hire a lawyer.
  3. Full Cash Bond—This is when the entire bond amount must be posted before defendant can be released. A true full cash bond is rare as Michigan law and the Michigan constitution require a defendant to have a surety option unless the defendant has been convicted of the charge, failed to attend a pre-sentencing hearing, or failed to attend sentencing. Full cash bonds are for defendants who pose a high flight risk.
  4. Personal Recognizance—Known as a PR bond, you are not required to post any money upfront. These are generally given for low severity crimes (misdemeanors) and when the defendant is not a flight risk. A bond amount is given but the defendant does not have to post it upfront. The defendant would only be liable for the bond amount if he failed to appear for any court dates.

Bond can be denied for very serious offenses such as murder. You may also be required to put up some collateral if going through a bondsman. Some bond schedules are pre-determined on a bail schedule list, even for felonies. That way if you get arrested the schedule will be at the jail so you know how much you need to post to get released. A lot of misdemeanor arraignments can be waived with the filing of a written waiver of arraignment stating that you know what you are charged with and the maximum penalties. Check with the court in your jurisdiction to determine if that is an option.

If you are charged with a crime it is important to be represented by an experienced criminal defense lawyer at arraignment to effectively argue for a reasonable bond and bond conditions. Arraignment is a critical stage because you only get one initial chance to argue for bond. Otherwise, your attorney will have to file motions for a bond reductions or modifications in the conditions which takes time and may not be granted. Contact Austin Legal Services, PLC to speak to a Michigan pre-trial arraignment attorney at (517) 614-1983 today!

Defending felony and misdemeanor criminal charges throughout Michigan in the counties of Ingham, Eaton, Clinton, Livingston, Jackson, Kent, Calhoun in the cites of Lansing, East Lansing, Mason, St. Johns, Charlotte, Brighton, Howell, Jackson, Grand Rapids, Battle Creek.